In-Depth Information About The Proposal Forms

Here's an image of the proposal form with reference numbers that have explanations below… :o)



The explanation of what those reference numbers are…


Section 1

You'll enter your license number and expiration date in these fields.

If you're using a form that does not have provision for license information then that section is completely blank - the words "License" and "Expiration Date" do not appear.

Section 2

This is where you'll enter your company name. I can help with this and if you want it to be a different color I can help with that as well.

Section 3

You'll enter your company information such as address, phone, email, website, etc. in this section.

Section 4

This section is a Page ___ of ___. Chances are with this form it'll be 'Page 1 of 1'.

Section 5

In this section you'll include:
  • The date of your proposal

  • The name of the project and it's location

  • The date and page number(s) of the plans and specs that you used to do your takeoff and bid

  • A field to enter a company name or person's name or if you're bidding to several entities you could enter something like "Multiple".
    A benefit of doing that when you're a subcontractor bidding to several general/direct contractors is that your regular GC's/DC's see that you don't just sit around on your laurels waiting for them to call you with work (kinda 'ups' your perceived value a bit). ;)
  • Your customer's phone and fax numbers as well as their address, city, state, and zip.
    If you're bidding to multiple entities and you choose to keep the proposal form 'generic' (as mentioned in the 'Multiple' section above) then it may be easiest to leave the phone numbers, fax numbers, etc. blank.

    If you decide to put each GC/DC's name on the proposal form then you'll fill in the rest of the fields with their phone/fax/address.

    And then obviously if you're bidding to just one entity you'll enter their information.
Feel free to enter an email address in any of the fields - they're not restricted in what you can enter.

SECTION 6 - VERSATILITY AT ITS FINEST
This section, which is for the 'meat' of your bid, is 'wide-open' - meaning you're not locked in to writing up your proposal in a format that you don't want to use.
  • If you want to write it up in a line item format you're able to…
  • Item #1 $100.00
    Item #2 $200.00
    Item #3 $300.00
  • If you'd rather write it up as paragraphs you're able to…
  • "Due to rot the entire porch must be removed and replaced resulting in an extra charge." $8.000.00

    Due to same rot replace the outside stairs. $2,000.00
  • If you wish to combine the two methods above, or use a completely different layout, you're able to…
There are no restrictions which makes it perfect for all trades.

If you perform more than one trade that makes this form even more valuable to you because you can use it for every trade you're involved in!

Section 7

Here is where you'll enter the cost of your bid using both numerical and alpha characters (that's just a fancy way of explaining something like … $100 / One-Hundred Dollars). ;o)

Section 8

This is the legalese section. Depending on which form you're using this section will differ.

The Style #1 and Style #4 forms contain the following:
"All material is guaranteed to be as specified. All work to be completed in a substantial workmanlike manner according to specifications submitted, per standard practices. Any alteration or deviation from above specifications involving extra costs will be executed only upon written orders, and will become an extra charge over and above the estimate. All agreements contingent upon strikes, accidents or delays beyond our control. Owner to carry fire, tornado and other necessary insurance. Our workers are fully covered by Workmen’s Compensation Insurance. If either party commences legal action to enforce its rights pursuant to this agreement, the prevailing party in said legal action shall be entitled to recover its reasonable attorney’s fees and costs of litigation relating to said legal action, as determined by a court of competent jurisdiction."
The Style #2 and Style #5 forms contain the following:
"All material is guaranteed to be as specified. All work to be completed in a substantial workmanlike manner according to specifications submitted, per standard practices. Any alteration or deviation from above specifications involving extra costs will be executed only upon written orders, and will become an extra charge over and above the estimate. All agreements contingent upon strikes, accidents or delays beyond our control. Owner to carry fire, tornado and other necessary insurance. Our workers are fully covered by Workmen’s Compensation Insurance. Accounts overdue beyond 30 days of billing will be charged at an interest rate of _____ per annum. Customer is also liable for an additional _____% of unpaid balance plus incidental collections costs, including attorney fees. If either party commences legal action to enforce its rights pursuant to this agreement, the prevailing party in said legal action shall be entitled to recover its reasonable attorney’s fees and costs of litigation relating to said legal action, as determined by a court of competent jurisdiction."
The Style #3 and Style #6 forms are blank in that area so that you can enter the specific legalese text that you'd like to be there (feel free to copy any and/or all of the above).

Section 9

This is where you enter the number of days that the offer is good for and then sign the document. The pdf version has the option to be signed digitally.

Section 10

This is where your customer signs their acceptance of your bid.

You *must* include the date of the plans and the page number(s)

A very important section of this form that you do not want to ignore is the section for the plan dates and pages.

Be absolutely certain to put as much information as you can in there to describe what set of drawings you were working off of. If need be continue the information into the body of the proposal form.

It's important to be *exact* with this information

If revisions are made to the drawings/specs/plans and you don't know and you sign a contract that's based on the most recent set of plans (that you're unaware of) you could find yourself in over your head on the job due to additional work you didn't account for.

On the flip side if your customer signs *your* proposal then you're good because you know that the contract (signed proposal) and price are based on the plans you had.

If you have to sign your customer's contract you must insist that the plan dates and pages that the contract is based on be included in the contract

Compare the dates and pages on your bid to the dates and pages that are written into the contract. This will keep you from signing a contract that's based on a set of plans that you weren't aware of.

If that specific information isn't in there and you sign the contract then chances are you'll be bound to perform to the latest set of plans whether or not you had a chance to see them beforehand.

Insist that the information be included in the contract.

*Always* include a timeframe at which point your bid expires

Near the bottom of the form is Section 9 where you can put in an amount of days that you allow before the proposal expires.

Typically I see it set at 30 days. Whatever you do just…

Make sure that your expiration date isn't *after* your supplier's expiration date

Don't get stuck honoring today's prices many months down the road when material costs may be higher.

Last thing you want to do is perform a job paying wages and material costs that are now higher than those costs were when you originally bid the job!

Download upon completion of your purchase

You'll be able to immediately download the proposal forms package upon completion of your purchase.

There'll be a download button/link on the right side of your receipt/confirmation page.

I Wish You The Best Of Luck On Your Bid!!! :o)


Construction Proposal Form Style #1
This proposal form, which provides fields for your license # & expiration date, contains basic, standard legalese text.

Check out the bundled package for a savings of $10 (click here).

Preview Proposal Form Style #1
$19.99
PROP-001
Construction Proposal Form Style #4
This proposal form, which does not require license info, contains the same basic standard legalese text that Style #1 has.

Check out the bundled package for a savings of $10.

Preview Proposal Form Style #4
$19.99
PROP-004
Construction Proposal Form Style #2
Includes your license # and exp. date. Includes the same basic legalese as #1 plus a space to charge interest.

Check out the bundled package for a savings of $10 (click here).

Preview Proposal Form Style #2
$19.99
PROP-002
Construction Proposal Form Style #5
This proposal form, which does not require license info, contains the same basic standard legalese text that Style #2 has.

Preview Proposal Style #5

Check out the bundled package for a savings of $10 (click here).
$19.99
PROP-005
Construction Proposal Form Style #3
Include your contractor's license # and exp. date. The legalese section is blank so that you can enter your own.

Check out the bundled package for a savings of $10!

Preview Proposal Form Style #3
$19.99
PROP-003
Construction Proposal Form Style #6
No contractor's license # or expiration date required. The legalese section is blank so that you can enter your own.

Preview Proposal Form Style #6

Check out the bundled package for a savings of $10 (click here).
$19.99
PROP-006
Monk and DBug, LLC
Diane Marie Forster-Dennis
1640 SW Mulberry Place
Suite #201
Oak Harbor WA 98277
(866) 480-7105 (fax)
Send an email to Diane